Committing the Perfect Robbery: Lars Bjerre at Hunter / Whitfield

Ordinarily, Lars Bjerre explores ambivalent spatiality and abandoned interiors through his painting and installation work. However, for his latest solo exhibition entitled "The Robbery" at Hunter / Whitfield gallery in London, Bjerre will shape-shift into covert thief to commit "the perfect robbery". We caught up with Bjerre in the lead up to his show, discussing his renegade activities and metaphorical motivations for stealing London's crown jewels.

Lars Bjerre. Photograph by Alexander Coggin.

A selection of Lars Bjerre's work is available for purchase on Sleek Art.

What was the original inspiration for your new solo "The Robbery" at Hunter / Whitfield?

I always dreamed of pulling off the perfect robbery - so the process of making work for the exhibition was a great opportunity to plan it. The robbery itself is not as interesting to me as the planning is and since the exhibition is taking place in London, I thought it would be a cool idea to steal the Crown Jewels.

Lars Bjerre, The Robbery (The Imperial State Crown), 2015, oil, pigment & spray on canvas. 161 x 150 cm. Oak frame (164 x 154 x 4 cm). Image courtesy of the artist Lars Bjerre, The Robbery (The Imperial State Crown), 2015, oil, pigment & spray on canvas. 161 x 150 cm. Oak frame (164 x 154 x 4 cm). Image courtesy of the artist. See available works by Lars Bjerre on Sleek Art

Does the exhibition see a continuation of your previous painterly approach or is this a new direction for you?

I became obsessed with the image of the crown - its preciousness, in a sense - and basically slaughtered that image until I started to really understand what it was that I was dealing with. This kind of motivation is similar to my previous work which employs specific motifs, that could be using wood or the colour aubergine. This almost becomes an endless repetition until something that resembles a template is created. But I also like the analogy between the robber and the the prey, versus the artist and the motif or material.

How do you respond to the physical process of painting?

I prefer to work in a contextualised series where each one explores a new narrative, specific theme or material and thus poses a new set of questions. I enjoy this process, particularly with painting, because it's my favourite way of expressing myself.

"The Robbery" is showing at Hunter / Whitfield, London until 8 August 2015